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This week we’re happy to feature a guest post by Jenni Mahnaz, of Witness Humanity, whose expertise on packing with teens grew from her backpacking trip across India with her daughter.

There are many articles out there about packing minimally with children- articles that really help you get down to the nitty-gritty needs when packing up the littles. But what about carry on packing with teens?

Teens are no longer in need of an adult packer but sometimes they need a little guidance, especially for a first trip. No 15 year old wants to be told by mom what she is, and is not, allowed to bring on a trip. However, if your family is dedicated to taking as little as possible, you may feel the urge to drive those packing decisions. So, how do you guide your teen when packing while simultaneously teaching him independence and autonomy?

Give Advance Warning

Give teens plenty of time and discuss limitations before hand. Springing clothing, electronic, and toiletry limitations on a your child at the last minute is a recipe for disaster. Make carry on only plans known far in advance so there are no surprises. Repeat the plans whenever the opportunity presents itself. Teens genuinely have lots going on in their minds and in their lives so hearing repeatedly that everyone will only be taking a carry on bag can really help get them in the right frame of mind when it’s time to pack.

Make a List

Not any old list, a list that details what they want to bring, what kinds of double duty an item might serve, and how versatile it is. Do this together but don’t be married to the idea that it must be done on paper. Talking out a list, drawing it, texting a list to yourself, and laying things out to look at are all valid ways of “making a list.” The point is to help your teen visualize how, and when, things might be used. We all fall into the, “I-might-need-this-nail-polish-so-I’ll-just-throw-it-in,” trap. Don’t get frustrated if your teen does the same. Just ask when and how he sees himself using that item. If she can’t think of a specific use, suggest setting it aside until the end. If there is still room after they pack the essentials, he can add a few items under the “just in case” category. Click to continue…

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Offices? We don’t need no stinkin’ offices!

Normally when you think of going to work, you may imagine waking up early, dressing for success, and spending most of your day behind a desk. Working remotely allows teams to be productive in their own environments. (It also keeps some of us from getting fired for singing Christmas carols year-round.) Fred and Jeremy bring on Tortuga’s Concierge, yours truly, to discuss hiring and working with remote workers. Find out what systems our team has in place that allow us to successfully work together from different parts of the world.

In This Episode

  • 02:33 Where I work from and what I do
  • 05:15 Working in an office – helpful or hindering?
  • 06:52 How I’m managed
  • 09:04 Putdowns and praises of working for Fred and Jeremy
  • 12:19 Tortuga’s system for working remotely
  • 15:16 Establish expectations
  • 18:20 Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs)
  • 22:56 No set hours/hovering
  • 27:05 Softwares we use
  • 32:52 Advice for setting up remote working
  • 34:19 Have shared space
  • 35:49 Use systems that allow people to work from where they’re comfortable
  • 38:26 Hire the best person for the job
  • 41:42 Schedule retreats
  • 43:48 Word to the Wise

People On This Episode

Links from This Episode

Word to the Wise

  • Jeremy: The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt – Quirky and fun Netflix series. Jeremy describes it as “A Saturday morning cartoon with real people.”
  • Fred: Snippefy – App that lets you export your Kindle notes and highlights
  • Lauren: Deep Focus by Spotify – Spotify playlist with pretty music that isn’t distracting or weird

Win a $100 Tortuga Backpacks Gift Card

Every month we give away a $100 gift card to someone who subscribes to and reviews the podcast. Subscribers, ratings, and reviews are how the show gets ranked in podcast directories and found by more travelers. We appreciate your help spreading the word about Power Trip.

  1. Subscribe via iTunes, Stitcher, email, or your podcatcher of choice with our RSS feed.
  2. Leave a review in iTunes.
  3. Fill out this form after you’ve done both for a chance to win a gift card.

Feedback and Questions

If you have any feedback about the show or questions for us to answer on the air, email: podcast at tortuga backpacks dotcom.

In today’s installment of How I Travel, we talk with Georgia Nerheim, a Brooklyn based fashion photographer with a client list that includes top brands like Glamour, Victoria Secret, Women’s Health, Tanya Taylor, Avenue, Pamela Love, and even Microsoft. Originally from New York City, Georgia is constantly on the move shooting in exotic locations across the US and abroad. When not traveling the world — which is often — she can be found shooting something glamorous at a variety of New York City studios.

Who are you and what do you do?

My name is Georgia Nerheim. The romanticized world of fashion is where I focus my work. I frame the world with a camera and like to paint with light whenever I can – luckily it’s also my job. My intention is to show the beauty and humanity in the world through my pictures and hopefully inspire one’s imagination.

Georgia Nerheim photography

What about your travels inspired you to start your studio?

Travel is a part of the job. Different cultures and traditions give me a better understanding of humanity and light. With it also comes perspective, which is a necessity in photography and in life. I also learned to not take some things for granted at home as I get the chance to miss them when traveling so much. The experience and appreciation makes me the photographer I am.

kangaroo travel photography

Click to continue…

Earlier this month, my boyfriend and I spent four days in Portland on a long weekend getaway. Normally, I’d reach for a small weekender bag I bought for trips like this — but not for this one. This time, I wanted to challenge myself and see how light I could really pack.

Now, whenever friends of mine ask me how they can pack lighter, I tell them, “Get a smaller bag.” So, I took my own advice and switched out my weekender for the Tortuga daypack. It turns out, that was all I needed.

If you’re up for the challenge as well, let me share why daypacks are actually the best bag for weekend travel, and how to fit a weekend’s worth of stuff into one.

Daypack vs. Weekender Bag

Let’s tackle the first questions: Why would you want to use a daypack instead of a weekender bag anyway? What makes a daypack the best bag for weekend travel?

1. Essentials Only

Tortuga Daypack

The reason why I love the, “Get a smaller bag,” packing tip is because it forces you to really think about what you’re bringing. You have to be thoughtful about which items you pack, choose items with multiple uses, and stay simple with your packing approach.

For weekend travel, you may be tempted to pack an extra outfit — just in case — or be lazy and throw the whole bottle of shampoo in your bag just because you have the space. In reality, you don’t really need this stuff. With a daypack, you have to decide which items you really need, versus the ones you just want to bring, and throw temptation into your ‘no’ pile.

2. Freedom=Spontaneiety

On that note, there’s just something freeing about having less stuff on you. With only a daypack, it’s easier to take a couple extra hours getting from the train station to your hotel because you passed a cafe, museum, or park that caught your eye.

In short, the more stuff you have (even if it’s “only” a weekender) the more you plan your day around where to put that stuff. Click to continue…

In previous podcast episodes, we’ve discussed sourcing in China and how to communicate well with suppliers. Now Fred and Jeremy are giving you a closer look at the process of visiting a factory in China. Find out what to expect, how to plan, and whether or not it is customary to get good and sauced with your supplier.

In This Episode

  • 05:02 Before you get to the factory
  • 06:55 Advanced planning
  • 08:49 What to bring to a factory
  • 10:25 Finding factories
  • 11:42 What to do when you’re there
  • 15:04 Factory working conditions
  • 17:13 Weird things that are normal in China
  • 19:03 Who you deal with at the factory
  • 23:16 You’re back in the USA… now what?
  • 25:13 When to revisit
  • 27:51 Word to the Wise

People On This Episode

Links from This Episode

Word to the Wise

  • Jeremy: What Happens to Our Brains When We Exercise and How it Makes Us Happier – Apparently it’s not just something that the crazy Crossfitters say to shame you into joining their quest for pecs that could sink the Titanic. Take a look at this article for actual, visual examples of how exercise helps you feel great.
  • Fred: Google Translate App – This app will come in handy when you’re trying to communicate in a foreign country (or when you’re trying to order dinner).

Win a $100 Tortuga Backpacks Gift Card

Every month we give away a $100 gift card to someone who subscribes to and reviews the podcast. Subscribers, ratings, and reviews are how the show gets ranked in podcast directories and found by more travelers. We appreciate your help spreading the word about Power Trip.

  1. Subscribe via iTunes, Stitcher, email, or your podcatcher of choice with our RSS feed.
  2. Leave a review in iTunes.
  3. Fill out this form after you’ve done both for a chance to win a gift card.

Feedback and Questions

If you have any feedback about the show or questions for us to answer on the air, email: podcast at tortuga backpacks dotcom.

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