Don't Leave Anything Behind

Perfect your packing with our free carry on packing list.

Join our mailing list below to get your packing checklist and biweekly packing tips sent straight to your inbox.



Spam is the worst, so we won't send you any.

In today’s installment of How I Travel, we talk to Charity, from The Rich Life. Originally from Hawaii, Charity is currently based in San Francisco. When not traveling the world — which she has been lucky enough to do a lot of — she can be found blogging about packing and living a rich life with less.

Who are you and what do you do?
My name is Charity Yoro. I am a writer, traveler, avid entrepreneur, foodie, and self-proclaimed “practitioner of packing light.” By day, I help to build an awesome community at a coworking space in downtown San Francisco. By night, I write.

What about your travels inspired you to start your blog?
I love storytelling. I find that those are the best souvenirs to collect while traveling. I started my blog (The Rich Life) originally to share my story and also the advice I’ve collected over the years living as a nomadic islomaniac.

So far, it’s been live for well over a year and, with the help of several contributors, we’ve been able to collect a lot of great content on traveling, and living with less.

What’s your travel style and why? (Budget, luxury, digital nomad, etc.)
Light and resourceful. I like to get creative with how little I can pack and how many uses I can find for certain items!

Generally, I also travel on a budget, but know that there are definitely some things, like a great meal, or once-in-a-life-time experience, worth splurging on.

What was your first great travel experience?
My first great experience was probably when I studied abroad in Bangkok, Thailand.

Even though I had traveled before, it was the first time that I really explored a foreign country in depth and over a period of time. It was a passionate, wondrous love affair — and has inspired numerous international trips since! Click to continue…

Don't Leave Anything Behind

Perfect your packing with our free carry on packing list.

Join our mailing list below to get your packing checklist and weekly packing tips sent straight to your inbox.



Spam is the worst, so we won't send you any.

In 2007, Tim Ferriss’s chart-topping book, The 4-Hour Workweek, created a blueprint for living on your own terms. Listen in as Fred and Jeremy share their experiences with The 4-Hour Workweek- discussing what concepts were more challenging than expected and what factors have remained true for building a business in the 8 years that have passed since its publication.

In This Episode

  • 02:44 Eating insects
  • 05:26 Tortuga updates
  • 06:55 Challenges with the 4-Hour Workweek
  • 08:57 White Labeling
  • 11:54 Barrier to entry
  • 13:48 Love what you do!
  • 16:54 Ferriss’s business model works!
  • 19:03 Lifestyle business
  • 25:26 Set work goals based on your priorities
  • 27:44 Passive income
  • 36:16 Word to the Wise

People On This Episode

Links from This Episode

Word to the Wise

  • Jeremy: Having an “accountabilibuddy” while writing – having someone to hold you accountable to your writing deadlines makes you more productive
  • Fred: TripAdvisor mobile app – Offers offline access to maps in local languages to help you get around in foreign cities

Win a $100 Tortuga Backpacks Gift Card

Every month we give away a $100 gift card to someone who subscribes to and reviews the podcast. Subscribers, ratings, and reviews are how the show gets ranked in podcast directories and found by more travelers. We appreciate your help spreading the word about Power Trip.

  1. Subscribe via iTunes, Stitcher, email, or your podcatcher of choice with our RSS feed.
  2. Leave a review in iTunes.
  3. Fill out this form after you’ve done both for a chance to win a gift card.

Feedback and Questions

If you have any feedback about the show or questions for us to answer on the air, email: podcast at tortuga backpacks dotcom.

“Why do you travel with your normal clothing?” My friend said, glancing at me over the rim of her beer. “Whenever I travel, I use clothes that are perfect for traveling. You know, so if you get stuck in the rain – like you do all the time – you don’t end up a wet grumpy mess in cold jeans.”

I swatted her hand away. “I like my clothes. Why would I get new ones just for a trip? What’s wrong with my clothes?”

“Nothing. Except they’re not good for traveling in. Especially your jeans.”

“Says who? My jeans are perfect. They’re comfortable, take a beating, hide stains. All very important.”

“Except in the rain.”

“So what? Rain is just rain. That’s stupid to buy new clothes just for traveling. What’s wrong with the clothes you wear now? Are they not good enough for your travel persona?”

She laughed. “They don’t cut it. They can’t keep up with me. I want clothing that works harder than me.”

Maybe you’ve had this conversation with someone. Or maybe you’ve had it with yourself, in your mind pre-trip. Or while reading this blog.

It’s a big question in the travel community: pack your normal clothing or get new technical clothing that’s specially designed to wick sweat, wash fast, and fly through cities like Spiderman?

I’m kidding. No clothing engineered yet can let you fly. (When it does, let me know — I’d be all over that.)

In this post, we faceoff between the two types of travel clothing most hotly disputed:

  1. Pants: yea or nay on jeans?
  2. Shoes: designed for travel vs. normal everyday shoes

Click to continue…

I’m awakened by a vicious bump that slams my head against the window. I’m traveling south on the night bus along the Ecuadorian coast on the hunt for the epic mile-long waves of South America. Groggy and dazed, I glance at my phone. It’s 3:30 am, and I can’t help feeling that something’s not right. Then it hits me.

I slept through my stop.

I manage to stop the bus. The driver apologizes, but assures me it’s a short walk back to town. I nod my relief and thanks and prepare for a quick hike. Unfortunately, during this leg of the trip I also had a surfboard bag and a guitar. Lucky me.

Five miles and two hours later I stagger into town as the sun rises. The morning sea air is cool, but my shirt is drenched in sweat. My shoulders burn and all I can think about is sleeping the day away in a sagging bunk bed.

Sometimes no matter how hard you try – your trip just doesn’t fit in the overhead compartment. So until collapsible surfboards and folding guitars become more affordable, here’s how to travel with three common oversized items – skis, surfboards, and a guitar – without them weighing you down:

Skis & Snowboards:Bundle Your Gear Together

Most airlines count boot bags, pole bundles, and ski bags as three separate checked oversized bags – each with it’s own $25-$35 fee. Snowboards, while easier to pack, face the same restrictions for boots and helmet cases.

Avoid excess fees and bundle everything into one bag. As long as your bag weighs less than 50 pounds most airlines only charge the normal $25 checked bag fee.

Pro Tip: Ski bags less than 50 lbs. are often free to check on international flights. Forget Aspen. Go to Murren. Click to continue…

Outlier is a performance clothing company that builds upon the idea that less is more. With garments that are created to perform, to be versatile, and to last, it is a company that is adding its own flare to the clothing industry. Listen in as Fred and Jeremy interview Abe Burmeister, co-founder and CEO of Outlier. Together, they discuss Outlier’s growth, beginnings, their awesome product photography, and more.

In This Episode

  • 01:27 Meet Abe Burmeister from Outlier
  • 02:26 Living out of a carry-on for 4 years
  • 12:55 How Outlier has grown
  • 21:39 Involvement in the design process
  • 22:57 Behind Outlier’s amazing product photography
  • 26:22 Travel style
  • 27:40 Outlier as travel clothes
  • 30:50 Weird use-cases (melting pants!)
  •  32:06 Outlier’s office technology
  • 35:42 Lessons learned in work-travel
  • 42:47 Advice for starting a clothing company
  • 52:13 Word to the Wise

People On This Episode

Links from This Episode

  • Outlier – Company creating durable, versatile clothes
  • Boblbee – Hard shelled backpack
  • Emeliano Granado – Responsible for many of the beautiful product photos for Outlier
  • Slack – Platform for team communication
  • Asana – Platform where teams can manage projects and tasks without email
  • Rapha – High-end cycling gear

Word to the Wise

  • Jeremy: The Jinx – Great HBO true-crime story about Robert Durst
  • Fred: Planet Money 610 – Podcast episode telling the story of an entrepreneur who spent time in prison and was inspired to start a business

Win a $100 Tortuga Backpacks Gift Card

Every month we give away a $100 gift card to someone who subscribes to and reviews the podcast. Subscribers, ratings, and reviews are how the show gets ranked in podcast directories and found by more travelers. We appreciate your help spreading the word about Power Trip.

  1. Subscribe via iTunes, Stitcher, email, or your podcatcher of choice with our RSS feed.
  2. Leave a review in iTunes.
  3. Fill out this form after you’ve done both for a chance to win a gift card.

Feedback and Questions

If you have any feedback about the show or questions for us to answer on the air, email: podcast at tortuga backpacks dotcom.

123456789Last